How do Long Street residents and hotels measure the CCID …

From the Cape Argus, by Lynette Johns, 5th July 2012

LONG Street residents say they are fed up with high noise levels, crime and grime and are now asking what the role of the Central City Improvement District really is.

Byron Qually who heads up the Long Street Residents Association says for the monthly levy which comes to R200 per resident, the impact is being questioned.

They say the CCID is far more concerned about the rights of business than those of residents, and too much money is spent on marketing and not enough on security and dealing with the real issues of crime and grime. Qually estimates that there are between 800 to 1 000 people living in and around Long Street. The CCID is a “top-up” of the services offered by the municipality.

Chief Operating Officer of the CCID, Tasso Evangelinos said he was more than happy to meet with the association.

Restaurant and boutique hotel owner Janis Ross says there are concerns from residential apartments and hotels being overlooked by the CCID in favour of bars and nightclubs which is detrimental to their businesses.

Ward Councillor Dave Bryant said the a special unit in the city’s law enforcement dealt with issues of noise pollution and two months ago the sound equipment of a popular nightclub was confiscated.

According to the residents association noise pollution and “associated criminal threats” is the main reason why Long Street residents are leaving the city. “Increasing costs, not just for additional levies, but due to long-term city parking being limited, and 24 hour charge for parking on the street is causing concern,”

Qually said. According to the association, Long Street residents collectively contributed between R120 000 to R150 000 every month. “This excludes those businesses that also pay a monthly CCID levy,” Qually said. He questioned why R19 million was spent on security service who had no power of arrest and R2 million on marketing.

“Both nightclub and residents have requested that part of that budget to go to a full time police officer who is invested with powers of arrest, but again no progress has been made on this. Why does an organisation such as this require such an large budget. Surely, it should be reallocated to the provision of services,” Qually said.

Bryant said the CBD was becoming increasingly mixed use and more people were moving in, but he understood the qualms Long Street residents have. “It is an area where issues around noise is high and that is because of all the clubs,” he said.

Ross said there are enormous concerns about the noise levels in Long street and these had to be addresses and by-laws enforced with urgency. “I have met many residents who have moved or who are looking to move and whilst most of our guests love our hotel they complain bitterly about the noise factor, and the ongoing harassment by informal car guards, drug dealers, illegal pavement parking and general unruly behaviour,”

Ross said. While the CCID had put more security on the street they did not have the power to arrest anyone and this posed a problem. “Less of these (security) and the deployment of police and traffic officers with the power of arrest would be welcomed by all,” Ross said.

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From the Cape Argus, 6th July 2012

Cape Town’s Central City Improvement District has hit back at Long Street residents, saying most of its budget is spent on security and that Cape Town CBD is the safest and cleanest in the country. The Long Street Residents Association says the CCID is not doing enough about noise, crime, grime and parking, and queried its R33 million budget.

CCID chief operating officer Tasso Evangelinos said an independent survey had found that Cape Town’s CBD was considered to be one of the safest and cleanest in the country, and this was “thanks in no small part to the efforts of the CCID”.

Since the launch of the CCID in 2000, crime had fallen by close to 90 percent. It was the role of the city council to deal with noise pollution. Evangelinos said the cost of parking had come up strongly in recent surveys as an issue of concern for all users of the CBD. The CCID had passed the findings on to the city, which had started a public participation process, with the current parking tender about to expire.

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